MANZANITA – The Hoffman Center art gallery hosts the work of four artists for its September show.

The show features ceramic artist Nicole Hummel, botanical drawings from Dorata Haber-Lehigh, paintings and drawings from Carl Whiting and basketry and ceramics from Kathleen Kanas.

The show runs Sept. 5-29, Thursdays-Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m.

There will be an opening reception on Saturday, Sept. 7 from 3-5 p.m. with an artist’s talk at 4 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

Hummel has been a potter for over a decade and this show will feature a selection of her recent work. Much of her work is fired in wood kilns across the state of Oregon.

Haber-Lehigh is an artist, educator and a naturalist with a passion for native plants of the Pacific Northwest. Born in Poland, Haber-Lehigh enjoys depicting flora of the Pacific Northwest, often native plants, and portraying them with their sculptural and ephemeral beauty.

Whiting is an artist, writer and environmental advocate residing in Wheeler. His favorite subject to explore, photograph, paint and write about is the infinite variety of life around the beautiful Nehalem Bay, a place he first visited more than 20 summers ago.

Kanas has resided in Manzanita since 1979. She opened the 4th Street Studio & Gallery Gallery in 1994. She has been creating traditional and organic basket styles for more than 50 years. Recently, she has begun to explore clay in conjunction with natural fibers.

The Hoffman Gallery is located at 594 Laneda Ave. in Manzanita and is free and open to the public.

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